Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19)

 

Coronavirus is a family of viruses, meaning there are several strains of coronavirus. Health care providers have seen coronavirus for years and regularly test for the common strains. COVID-19 has warranted intensive surveillance by the CDC because it is a novel strain, meaning it is a strain that had not been seen before; therefore, we are still learning how it spreads and the scope of disease it causes. 

As the COVID-19 outbreak continues, we know that our patients and communities are concerned about how the virus is spreading and how we may respond. We are working closely with our federal, state and local partners to stay informed with the most current information, to update our plans and to educate the community. Please use the content in this section of our website as a resource. 

testing & Isolation instructions

There is a specific test for COVID-19 and testing must take place at a designated laboratory. Maury Regional Health continues to follow CDC guidelines for testing. Patients experiencing flu-like symptoms including fever, cough, difficulty breathing, sudden loss of taste or smell and/or close contact with a person known to have COVID-19 should always call before arriving at any health care location. If you are urgently ill, please inform 911, the ambulance staff and/or emergency department registration staff that you may have COVID-19.

Individuals Without Symptoms
Maury Regional Health continues to follow CDC guidelines for testing. If you are asymptomatic (no symptoms) and have not been in contact with a person known to have COVID-19, Maury Regional Health will not provide a test. For more information about testing, visit the Tennessee Department of Health website

Individuals With Symptoms
Individuals experiencing flu-like symptoms including fever, new or increased cough, unusual shortness of breath should self-isolate and seek medical evaluation and testing for COVID-19. ALL symptoms must be resolved (without fever reducing medications) at least 3 days (72 hours) before leaving the house or being in close contact with anyone. Even after recovery, please continue the recommended social distancing for all. If you are self-isolating and feel that your condition has worsened and you need medical attention, you should always call before arriving at any health care location. Any individual who is urgently ill and requires immediate medical attention should inform 911, the ambulance staff and/or emergency department registration staff that they may have COVID-19.

Patients With Possible COVID-19 Exposure
If you have been in close contact with a person known to have COVID-19 but do not have symptoms, you should quarantine yourself for 14 days. Symptoms may appear 2-14 days after exposure and may include fever, new or increased cough,  unusual shortness of breath or sudden loss of taste or smell. If your condition worsens and you need medical attention, you should always call before arriving at any health care location. 

Patients Positive for COVID-19
Most patients diagnosed with COVID-19 have mild symptoms and recover on their own. We encourage you to self-quarantine for a minimum of 10 days. ALL symptoms must be resolved (without taking any fever-reducing medications) at least 3 days (72 hours) before leaving the house or being in close contact with anyone.

Patients on Quarantine
If you have been tested for COVID-19 and been placed on home quarantine, you MUST follow the quarantine instructions until you receive results and further guidance from your provider. Do not assume if you feel better or stop running a fever that you are no longer contagious. If you feel that your condition has worsened and you need medical attention, you should always call before arriving at any health care location. Any individual who is urgently ill and requires immediate medical attention should inform 911, the ambulance staff and/or emergency department registration staff that they may have COVID-19.

Urgently Ill Patients
Any individual who is urgently ill and requires immediate medical attention should inform 911, the ambulance staff and/or emergency department registration staff that they may have COVID-19.

If you have questions about your potential health risk, please call your primary care provider or the Tennessee Department of Health Coronavirus Public Information Line at 877.857.2945.

Please use these resources from the CDC for information on managing your health at home:

10 things you can do to manage your health at home

Patient quarantine information

Covid-19 information

The Tennessee Department of Health maintains an information line for community members who have questions about COVID-19, including those concerned about symptoms and treatment. Calls are answered by health care professionals who can address questions about COVID-19, including symptoms and self-monitoring recommendations, and direct patients to an appropriate location for care, if needed. Those who need information related to COVID-19 are encouraged to call their primary care provider or:

Tennessee Coronavirus Public Information Line

1.877.857.2945

hospital visitation guidelines

Effective Monday, June 1, Maury Regional Health has revised its visitation policy at Maury Regional Medical Center, Marshall Medical Center and Wayne Medical Center. For more information about current visitation guidelines, click here.

additional links

Protecting Against COVID-19

Tips for Parents

COVID-19 Newsroom

Medical Records & Bill Payment

Additional Resources

How You Can Help

Maury Regional Health has a multidisciplinary team that meets daily to review the latest Centers for Disease Control (CDC) data and clinical findings related to COVID-19. Our organization regularly prepares for the unexpected by conducting preparedness training designed to protect both our patients and our caregivers. Just in the last decade, outbreaks like swine flu, Ebola and Zika have strengthened our readiness and preparedness for infectious disease outbreaks. We are closely following CDC recommendations on how to best use and preserve existing supplies of personal protective equipment (PPE) to protect our health care team.

Individuals are encouraged to depend upon the CDC as the trusted source of information if they have any questions.

 

Updated 6/1/20